Women in Afghanistan have been allowed to return to their studies, but this isn't without strict measures set by the Taliban who have implemented gender segregation within classrooms.

Images taken by journalists allowed into one University in Afghanistan show male and female students being segregated in a classroom using a sheet.

Female students must wear the abaya robe and niqab covering and are required to enter through a separate entrance to male students. According to the Taliban's Ministry of Higher Education, female students also have to sit in "waiting rooms" before and after classes so they don't interact with male students.

The Times reports that female students can only be taught by female teachers, although "old men teachers who have a good record of behavior" will be allowed to stand in if no female teachers are available.

This week, private universities reopened in Afghanistan for the first time since the Taliban took control of the country.

The extremist group is using their decision to allow women to attend university as an example of their new and "improved" approach to governing.

However, human rights campaigners have shared their concerns that women are facing strict restrictions elsewhere.

In a Twitter thread, Shaharzad Akbar, chairperson of the Afghanistan International Human Rights Commission, said the Taliban was only letting women in "health, education & some relief organizations" attend work as long as they were accompanied by a "male family member."

"Women defenders, journalists, prosecutors & judges, local government officials live with fear & uncertainty, many anxious about what the next days/weeks hold as they watch the erasure of women from public & steps for formation of a new, male-led & dominated 'government,'" she tweeted.

The Times also adds that journalists in the region have seen multiple attacks made against women over the last month.

Women's rights protestors have faced an onslaught by Taliban soldiers, being tear-gassed and tasered, and one pregnant woman was even "killed in front of her family" for merely taking down a Taliban flag.