A mom has been shamed by a clown after she refused to allow her son to have a butterfly painted on his face.

Keep scrolling to find out more...

When it comes to little boys and girls...

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Many things are immediately decided for them, including what they'll like playing with and what they'll wear.

Little girls are often seen wearing pink and playing with dolls...

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While boys are kitted out in blue and play with cars and action figures.

This has been the norm for decades now...

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But where did these stereotypes come from?

Decades of research by the University of Maryland historian Jo Paoletti suggests that up until the 1950s, chaos reigned when it came to the colors of gender.

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"There was no gender-color symbolism that held true everywhere," Paoletti told Life's Little Mysteries.

"Because the pink-for-a-girl, blue-for-a-boy social norms only set in during the 20th century in the United States, they cannot possibly stem from any evolved differences between boys' and girls' favorite colors," Paoletti has argued.

The whole gender color code is certainly fueled by modern-day marketing.


Things such as baby books, congratulations cards, birthday cards, clothing, and gifts are extremely influenced by the boy-girl color code.

Can you imagine an "It's a Boy!" card in pink?

But now we're living in 2021, things are starting to change.


We're living in an era of gender fluidity and the LGBTQ+ community is bigger than ever!

Gender stereotypes are now being questioned...


And now that so many people identify as non-binary, meaning they don't assign themselves a gender, the whole "blue and pink" debate is now bigger than ever.

Why should little boys be expected to play with trucks and wear blue?

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And why can't little girls play with cars if they want to and wear t-shirts with dinosaurs on them?

But while many of us are now questioning gender stereotypes, not all parents are...

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And that brings us to the story of a mom who stopped her son having a butterfly painted on his face.

A decision that has been criticized online...

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One Twitter user, Sandra, took to the platform to share an incident that she witnessed between a mom and her son.

Sandra, who works as a clown and does face painting at events, was approached by a little boy who requested a butterfly be painted on his face.

But before Sandra could start painting, the boys mom said "no, he doesn't want that."

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Confused by his mom's response, Sandra asked the mom: "Butterflies are beautiful, shouldn't I paint what he wants?"

Unfortunately, the boy's mom did not agree and instead insisted: "No, give him something for boys."

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Even bringing the boy's dad in to ask what he thought...

To which he further reinforced gender stereotypes for their child by agreeing.

Although Sandra tried to persuade his parents, eventually, she had to paint a skull and crossbones instead.

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Or so they thought...

After she finished painting the skull, Sandra asked the boy if he would like a small blue butterfly as well.

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And when his mom interrupted stating "you didn't ask me," Sandra had the perfect response...

In her kindest voice Sandra said: "Oh I'm sorry, I thought this was for him."

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To which his mother responded: "I'm his mother. You need to ask me."

As the Twitter thread came to a close, Sandra explained that she said sorry to the child as they said bye.

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Sorry that "he was shamed for wanting to share in the joy that is the miracle and wonder of nature."