The controversial statue of Confederate General, Robert E. Lee, has finally been removed from Charlottesville, Virginia, after years and years of petitions and arguments for the statue to be taken down.

Another statue, honouring fellow Confederate, Stonewall Jackson, was also removed nearly four years after white supremacist and neo-Nazi groups stormed the Virginia college town to protect it.

The removal of the statues "is one small step closer to the goal of helping Charlottesville, Virginia, and America, grapple with the sin of being willing to destroy Black people for economic gain," according to a statement Charlottesville Mayor Nikuyah Walker gave to reporters earlier today.

General Lee's statue has been in place since 1924, whereas Stonewall Jackson's has been up since 1921. But now it appears they will never be resurrected as they will be placed into storage until the local council decides to sell, destroy, or otherwise dispose of the statues.


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There have been calls to remove the statues for years, and back in 2017, white supremacist groups descended on Charlottesville for a "Unite the Right" rally to protest efforts to remove monuments to those infamous 19th-century military leaders.

The 'protests' then turned deadly when James Alex Fields Jr. drove his car into counter protesters, killing one. Now Field's is serving a life sentence in prison.

The latest calls to remove the statues came in 2016, from high school student, Zyahna Bryant. Now Bryant is a member of the University of Virginia.

Speaking about the removal of the statues, Bryant said:

This is well overdue. No platform for white supremacy. No platform for racism. No platform for hate.

But who exactly was General Lee? Well, Lee was a commander in the Confederate army during the American Civil War who distinguished himself in many different battles.



Lee reportedly had a "mixed record" of military endeavours throughout the civil war before he was famously defeated at Gettysburg by Union Major General George Meade.

Just a few weeks after he became the general in chief of the armies of the Confederate states in 1865, Lee surrendered to Union General Ulysses S Grant.

Aside from war, Lee was reportedly very cruel to his slaves and encouraged his overseers to severely beat any who were captured after trying to escape.

According to the Chicago Tribune, one slave went so far as to say Lee was one of the meanest men she had ever met.

Well, it sure seems like Lee won't be celebrated any more.