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Managing waste in hotels is a very difficult thing to do. The high turnover and mindset of guests almost guarantees that lots of energy, products, and water will be spent to accommodate travelers.

via: Thrillist

Maybe you've noticed that hotels almost always seem to have full rolls of toilet paper and brand new wrapped soap for guests when they check in. Have you ever wondered what happens to the slightly-used rolls and bars or soap? Every day in the US, a million small bars of soap are thrown away as waste.

But one man, realizing how terrible and non-sustainable this practice was, put forth a plan to put all those wasted bars to good use.

via: Thrillist

Now, Clean the World collects and repurposes trashed bars of soap so that people in need can have access to hygienic cleaning supplies.

This is Clean the World CEO Shawn Seipler.

via: Thrillist

He traveled a lot in his previous career, one day realizing just how much waste is created by hotels. When he learned that it was all just thrown away, he felt compelled to find a better way of doing things.

His company does something called "rebatching."

via: Thrillist

He learned that many in impoverished areas all over the world face health issues and even early death due to a lack of access to cleaning supplies.

It didn't take Shawn long to dream up a better way of utilizing this waste.

via: Thrillist

Shawn said in an interview with Thrillist, “Then it was just a matter of figuring out how to get the soap to recycle, and getting into their hands. It was an aha moment, and I realized this was my calling. I called my Puerto Rican relatives and they said ‘let’s do it.’ Pretty soon we were sitting in my garage on pickle buckets with vegetable peelers, cooking soap."

The soap bars get broken down like any other recycled product, then reassembled to create a new, clean bar.

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The cause is so good that hotels actually PAY Clean the World to take their soap.

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The company gets about 50 cents per hotel room per month to re-use the waste generated by hotels. For that cost, Clean the World provides the staff with training, materials, and pick-up services.

CTW already has rebatching plants around the world, cutting down on delivery costs.

via: Thrillist

When the process is complete, the finished product is sent to organizations like the Red Cross and the Salvation Army.

The project is so successful that CTW is expanding the operation to include body wash, shampoo, and other liquid toiletries.

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20,000 volunteers check and submit any bottle that is at least 3/4 full.

Founded back in 2009, CTW has really made a difference.

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In 2016 alone, the company distributed seven million soap bars and also 400,000 hygiene kits to people in need.

Every year, 4,000 children die of preventable illnesses such as diarrhea and pneumonia.

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CTW's efforts ensure that access to soap reduces these figures.

Now even airlines are getting in on the act, donating blankets, ear plugs, and sleep masks that would otherwise be thrown away.

via: Thrillist

CTW is off to a great start, but there's a LOT of room for growth.

via: Thrillist

“There’s a whole world of hotels out there we can get to start donating," said Shawn. “Right now we’ve got 20% of all hotels in the U.S. That’s a lot of room to grow, and a lot of soap to make."