Sadly, a lot of people don’t know much about the Palace of Versailles in France. Many people only see it as a beautiful castle with gorgeous gardens, and obviously, it is both those things. But it is also so much more! There was death, destruction, and revolution! The castle housed some of the most hated people in all of French history and lived through the revolution which sparked famous stories such as, Les Miserables.

So buckle your seat belts as we take a drive back in time to re-live the events involving the Palace of Versailles. These will make your jaw drop.

The Rise To Fame

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Back in 1575, Albert de Gondi purchased the Versailles. He had an in with King Henry II, which helped circulate his name around the royal courts.

A Humble Abode

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The home of Marie-Antoinette might seem shabby and run down, but that couldn't be further from the truth. She lived a decent life while she was alive. Her quarters included a series of cottages within the park of Versaille, all created with a specific purpose in mind.

Hall Of Mirrors

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The castle has 357 mirrors. Imagine being vain enough that you need that in your life? Even weirder, was the fact that the people who constructed the mirrors were killed for spilling their secrets on how they made them.

UNESCO

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The land and everything that involves it has been protected by the United Nations. So, no matter what, people can go visit this place whenever they want.

The Hunting Club

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Louis XIII was so invested in the house and enjoyed his hunting trips at the land so much that he ended up purchasing it. Imagine being able to buy a castle in a moment's notice? Yeah, we wish.

The Lodge

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With 700 rooms, and over a thousand windows, it's safe to say that this house would be a GREAT place to hold a party. Too bad the Royals are using it.

The True Ruler

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Louis wanted people to know that his wife was the true ruler of Spain, as he was to France. Their rooms were made equal in order to reflect their respective reign of power. Talk about equal rights!

Beauty And The Beast

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So, sure, it's beautiful. But fun fact: it actually smells. The gardens ruined stunk and the canals made people sick. So at the end of the day is losing a nose worth the trouble of a pretty castle?

Hugo de Versailles

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The first mention of the area of Versailles was in a document from 1038, by a man named Hugo who owned the land. He was a Lord of the small space of land which held a church, and a tiny castle.

The Sun King Of France

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Lous XIV created his own solar system after appointing himself the minister and moving to Versailles.

The Final Stand

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Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette were the last family to reside there before a march of rebels ran them out of their house and onto the executioner.

After The Fact

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When the revolution was over, Versailles was given to the public. It was rumored that Charles-Francois Delacroix wanted to steal trinkets from the castle to melt down into a cannon. But that didn't happen.

Summer Readings

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Need a good book to read? Well, you can go to Versailles and just take out one of the books that are held in their 104 libraries.

Future Families

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Though the monarchy no longer resided in the Palace, another famous person did. Marie Louise, Napoleon's wife, lived there for a bit. She was probably living it up in style.

War, What Is It Good For?

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Wars cost money. And countries can run out of money, so Louis melted chamber pots in order to fund his war. He was scrappy.

Study Buddies

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Louis XV moved into the place because it was private enough for what he wanted to do. And no, it wasn't just to read books.

Final Words

Marie Antoinette's final words were: "Pardon me, I meant not to do it." Which is polite enough for a woman who was literally walking her way to the gallows. She had stepped on the executioner's foot.

King Louis XVIII

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He never lived in the palace, but for some weird reason, he liked to visit it and walk the empty halls. Maybe he was remembering a time he wished he could have been more a part of?

The Plague

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Versailles started to go down the drain thanks to the 100-years war and the plague. Even though it was far from many of the cities, it didn't matter. Versailles saw tragedy like everyone else.

Dress To Impress

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Anyone who visited the castle when the monarchy was residing there, was asked to dress up for the family. If not? See you on the other side.

The Cold Never Bothered Me Anyway

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They say that the cold here got so fast that once, the king's wine actually froze during his dinner. Whether that's true or not, we don't know, but you won't catch us there in the winter!

Let's Get It Started

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When the castle first opened, there was a massive party to celebrate. Hey, why not? With all that space and all that land, it would be criminal to do anything but that.

Hot Spot

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Do you know about the Peace of Paris? No? Well, all you have to know is that most, if not all treaties for a very long time were signed at Versailles, including that one.

Gardens

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So these people had their priorities in order. The jet fountain from the photo above was running at least every two weeks even if no one was in the building. They literally just did it for the aesthetic. Too bad they didn't have Instagram back then.

Reduce, Reuse, Recycle...Reboot?

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Instead of tearing down the gates when they got wrecked in the revolution, they were rebuilt in 2008 to their original glory. Good thing too, because look how astonishing they are.

Break A Leg

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The opera house was a wedding gift for Marie Antoinette after she joined the family. That's a really nice gift! All we get now is like, a fridge, and that's if we're lucky.

Stay Safe

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So, toothpicks. They look innocent enough right? Wrong. They'd been used for murder before, so Louis XIV banned them from his table. Who can blame him?

Mother Nature

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Ah, nature. It's so beautiful and complicated all at the same time. Really complicated. So complicated that the forests nearby were used for sex workers to meet with builders of the palace.

Nostalgia Can Get You

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Ever since the economy took a hit, the people of France found themselves visiting this place a lot more often. That awkward moment when modern people want to revisit a time that was plagued in war.

Roman Influence

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Those damn Romans are always imposing themselves... Their influence was so vast, that Louis XIV made the apartment have seven rooms, one for each planet.