Former Ballerina With Alzheimer’s Listens to Swan Lake and Starts Dancing Again | 22 Words

One woman who has been suffering from the tragic Alzheimer's disease has shown how music can often open the doors to memories that we thought were long forgotten...

Alzheimer's disease is one of the most terrible things a person can be diagnosed with.

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A physical disease of the brain that usually comes after a person has been suffering from dementia, Alzheimer's has unbelievably devastating effects.

It affects a lot more people than one would think...

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According to the Alzheimer's Association, an estimated 5.8 million Americans are currently living with the disease.

It more than often affects elderly people...

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And symptoms include forgetfulness, confusion, getting lost in familiar places, and personality changes.

The stages of Alzheimer's progress steadily...

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And the final stages are truly the worst when a person doesn't even know who they are anymore. They completely forget who their family members and friends are, and in extreme cases, a person can forget basic skills such as brushing their teeth, using the toilet, and even speaking.

It is a truly heartbreaking process...

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And it is even harder for those close to the person suffering.

Many children and spouses end up becoming full-time carers for their loved ones...

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And for someone to gradually watch their relative decline is one of the worst things that could ever be granted upon a person.

But as anybody would...

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People will do anything for the ones they love.

And sometimes...

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This can spark some recognition and memory in those suffering from the heinous disease.

Now, this brings us to today's touching story.

A woman has gone viral online after performing an emotional dance at a care home in Valencia that was sparked from listening to a song from her younger days.

After watching the clip of the elderly lady...

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People have been left truly touched.

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Marta C. Gonzalez worked at the New York Ballet as a prima ballerina in the 1960s...

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One of the most prestigious dance companies in the world.

Sadly, later in life, she began suffering from Alzheimer's...

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And she spent the rest of her days at a care home in Valencia until 2019, when she sadly passed away.

Shortly after her death, the Asociacion Musica para Despertar shared a video of her dancing and it blew up online.

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The Spanish charity uses music to uplift and inspire patients suffering from Alzheimer's, and they believe that music can help access parts of the brain where memories are hidden.

Marta was given headphones to listen to Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake, in the footage taken last year...

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And as soon as the music began, you could see in her face it had taken her back in time to 1967 when she performed on stage.

She clearly remembered the choreography from years gone by.

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The videos contained real clips from her performing on stage, intertwined with her performance at the care home.

Marta's dance was met with applause and amazement by everyone watching...

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Later admitting the music had made her "emotional."

The Asociacion Musica para Despertar, translating to Music Association for Awakening, captioned the video: "The power of music is immeasurable."

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The charity added: "A ballerina will always be a ballerina… the excitement to blossom; listening, feeling, and flying along with one of the songs of her life."

The video was posted to Facebook on November 8th, and was shared over 34,000 times in just 24 hours.

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Thousands praised Marta, including actor Antonio Banderas, and choreographer and theatre director Arlene Phillips.

Phillips said it had "absolutely broken her heart."

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Adding: "The glimpses of memory, the sadness for those with or a loved one living with Alzheimer’s. If music and dance can restore or hold memory, how precious."

Music therapy is thought to help manage all the negative side effects of Alzheimer's disease...

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As well as helping those with the disease who find it difficult to communicate.

Music can also reportedly reduce the need for medication in patients...

It really is an incredible thing. Rest in peace, Marta.