Gorillas Pose With Anti Poaching Rangers in Incredible Selfies | 22 Words

Some incredible selfies have emerged from a national park in the Democratic Republic of Congo of an anti-poacher ranger and some gorillas.

Keep scrolling to check it out...

It is a devastating reality that the majority of animals that are extinct are so because of humans.

via: Getty

Despite its barbaric practice, hunting is still very much a popular sport and way too many animals are unnecessarily killed because of it.

Of course, hunting remains very popular in several states here in America...

via: Getty

But Africa is sadly the world's hotspot for hunting and poaching.

Trophy hunting is all too common in Africa...

via: Getty

And its native animals, such as elephants, lions, zebras, and antelopes, are ruthlessly killed every year to simply become a trophy for the hunter.

Many argue that trophy hunting is actually saving wildlife...

But we all know that killing wild animals for sport is not good for "conservation"... at all.

And there's no denying how cruel hunting is...

Why can't people just leave these beautiful wild animals alone?!

But it seems that hunters aren't prepared to stop their inhumane sport any time soon...

via: Getty

The devastating news came in earlier this month that a world-famous gorilla lost his life after being "speared" by hunters.

Rafiki was a twenty-five-year-old mountain gorilla who lived in Uganda.

The gentle giant was a favorite of tourists who spent the majority of his life in the Bwindi Impenetrable National Park. He was the leader of a group of seventeen gorillas, and this group was described as habituated - meaning that its members were used to human contact.

A spear had been thrust into Rafiki's abdomen...

via: Getty

And according to National Geographic, the spear penetrated as deep as his internal organs. It was a terribly brutal attack and Rafiki did not deserve to die.

In the wild, there are just over 1,000 mountain gorillas in existence...

via: Getty Images

And the Uganda Wildlife Authority (UWA) has described Rafiki's death as a "very big blow."

Rafiki's death will be potentially disastrous to the group of gorillas he has left behind.

via: Getty

"The death of Rafiki leaves the group unstable and there is the possibility that it could disintegrate," Bashir Hangi from the UWA told the BBC. "It has no leadership at this time and it could be taken over by a wild silverback."

Tragic events such as these are the reason why so many anti-poaching rangers work tirelessly to protect wild animals...

via: The Elite Anti-Poaching Units and Combat Trackers

And the Elite Anti-Poaching Units and Combat Trackers work together to protect the animals in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

This group consists of roughly 600 park rangers in the Virunga National Park in the Democratic Republic of Congo...

via: The Elite Anti-Poaching Units and Combat Trackers

And they all work around the clock to protect their native animals.

They ensure poachers don't trespass on their land...

via: The Elite Anti-Poaching Units and Combat Trackers

And they also make sure that the wildlife is thriving in as natural of a way as possible. "These local men and women go through intensive training, risking their lives on a daily basis to safeguard the park's exceptional wildlife, including the last of the world's critically endangered mountain gorillas," the national park said about its rangers.

Of course, many of the animals interact with the rangers on a daily basis...

via: The Elite Anti-Poaching Units and Combat Trackers

And they have become used to being around select humans.

Especially the gorillas in the national park...

The primates have familiarized themselves with the park rangers and they're known to often gently approach them and check them out.

The poachers also provide veterinary care if necessary...

Meaning that a great deal of trust has been secured between the rangers and the gorillas.

It isn't uncommon to see some amazing selfies of the rangers and the gorillas...

And Ranger Mathieu Shamavu caught the eyes of the world with an amazing selfie he managed to capture with some of the locals.

Here is the show-stopping selfie...

Now that's what we call perfect timing!

It's usually rare for gorillas to stand on their hind legs...

But they often do it out of curiosity and it isn't a sign of aggression... which is a good sign for the ranger!

If that hasn't brightened up your day, we don't know what will!

Keep scrolling to check out the group of sea lions who photobombed a diver's selfie...