Dawson's Creek writer Heidi Ferrer has tragically taken her own life after struggling since contracting COVID-19 in April last year.

She was reportedly "bedridden and in constant physical pain" in May of this year and was "suffering from severe neurological tremors and numerous other worsening symptoms."

She tragically died last month.

Her husband, fellow writer Nick Guthe, took to Twitter on May 26th sharing a photo of Ferrer with a baby. She was fifty years old, leaving behind her husband and their son Bexon.

"She was an amazing mother," Guthe said.

Guthe confirmed to TMZ and Deadline that Ferrer had tackled months of living with COVID-19 and had subsequently taken her own life.

Her writing credits included Wasteland, The Hottie & the Nottie, and of course, Dawson's Creek.

She had contracted the virus in April 2020 and according to Deadline, she was "bedridden and in constant physical pain" in May of this year and she was "suffering from severe neurological tremors and numerous other worsening symptoms."

She wrote about her difficulties in 2 previous blog posts…

"In my darkest moments, I told my husband that if I didn't get better, I did not want to live like this. I wasn't suicidal, I just couldn't see any quality of life long term and there was no end in sight," she wrote in one post on her Girl to Mom blog in September.

"I know people will die from suicide, unable to work, even care for themselves, many are living alone, some are homeless. I know some already have. I gained the perspective that while I was not the most unlucky who died from this disease, I was not the luckiest who perhaps never catch it or have a completely asymptomatic case."

In January of this year, it looked like things were improving for the Writer's Guild of America member.

"I'm cautiously optimistic that I'm still improving slowly but surely every month. I had over 40 scary and even crippling Long Covid symptoms in July. Now I'm down to a few frustrating ones, but sooo much better." She wrote.

Ferrer's husband Guthe told TMZ that long-haul COVID is "a public health crisis that must be addressed quickly."

Ferrer was born in Salinas, Kans and made her way to Los Angeles in the late 80's to pursue an acting career at the American Academy of Dramatic Arts.

A few years later, she pursued screenwriting and sold her first spec, The C Word, to producer Arnold Kopelson, setting her down on a path that would lead to her twenty-four years as a member of the WGA.

For her passionate advocacy, the Infantile Scoliosis Project honored Ferrer in 2010 with the National Hero Award. In her memory, the organization has named the annual Parent Initiative Award after her.

The Dawson's Creek writer is survived by her husband, son, mother, and 2 sisters. Rest in Peace.