Asian elephants are a greatly respected species in Asian continents, and locals will go to great lengths to protect their native animals. But in recent times during the pandemic, people have been self-isolating... leaving these magnificent creatures to roam freely.

Keep scrolling to see the amazing sight of fifty elephants crossing a road in Thailand...

It isn't every day when you see fifty elephants walking together...

But for locals in Chachoengsao, which is east of Bangkok, this became a reality. But it is important to know the significance of these creatures in South-Eastern culture...

The Asian elephant is a majestic species.

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With it being the largest mammal on the Asian continent, this species of elephant is greatly respected in cultures all around Asia.

They are extremely sociable animals...

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The Asian elephant is usually spotted in groups of around 6 or 7 females, and they are known to join other groups of elephants to form a larger group.

This elephant is an important cultural symbol...

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And they are very much loved and respected across the Asian continents.

They symbolize wisdom and royal power...

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And many religious groups worship these beautiful animals.

These elephants are that loved, in fact, that they are celebrated every year...

The Elephant Festival in India is celebrated every year in Jaipur, and it focuses solely on the Asian elephant and its contributions to Indian culture. It attracts thousands of guests and it is very much a big part of Indian culture.

But the festival has caused controversy in the past...

The Elephant Festival was canceled in the years 2012 and 2014 due to protests from animal activists.

They stated that the paints that are applied to the elephant's skin are laced with chemicals, and would be potentially harmful to these wild animals. Activists also argued that the elephants taking part in the festival were being subjected to "performing" and, as a result, the Animal Welfare Board needed to grant permission for the animals to be used.

The Elephant Festival isn't the only celebration to use the animals, however...

The Temple of the Tooth, Buddhism's holiest shrine in Sri Lanka, holds the annual festival with traditional drummers and dancers as well as nearly 100 tamed Asian elephants.

The elephants involved in the festival are trained and come from sanctuaries...

And the majority of these majestic animals are treated with respect and are looked after efficiently and kindly.

But this sadly doesn't apply to all elephants...

From seeing the way in which wild animals were treated in circuses, it is clear that some animals that are tamed and are kept in sanctuaries and captivity will be abused and mistreated at the hands of sick and twisted individuals.

There are organizations out there battling to protect these elephants...

Save Elephant Foundation is a foundation that is dedicated to protecting Asian elephants all across the continent. Alongside working tirelessly to preserve and protect these beautiful animals, they have also set up Elephant Nature Park which is a safe sanctuary for abused elephants in Thailand.

They promote the humane treatment of elephants and all wildlife...

"It is our mission to save the Asian elephant from extinction and give domesticated elephants a life worth living by preserving habitat and increasing public awareness on humane treatment practices," the foundation stated.

They encourage the kind and respectful treatment of all elephants...

The foundation gives tourists and guests the opportunity to visit and meet the elephants that are under their care, which involves bathing, stroking, and feeding the animals, rather than riding them.

And as for the wild elephants...

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Tourists are encouraged by locals to respect the natural habitats of the animals and to give them their space at all times.

But of course...

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In the recent months, the population of us humans roaming around has dwindled thanks to the global pandemic.

Even though the deadly virus has brought life to a complete standstill...

Wild animals are flourishing more than ever without the presence of humans and invasive tourists.

Locals in Chachoengsao, Thailand, recently experienced a beautiful sight.

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Traffic was brought to a complete halt at a road crossing by dozens of elephants who emerged from a nearby forest.

It has been estimated that the family contained around fifty elephants...

via: Youtube

A large matriarch elephant is seen leading the herd across the road as she leisurely strolls across to the jungle on the other side.

She is closely followed by the rest of the herd all in touching distance with babies in tow.

One elephant briefly stops before carrying on as the whole heard clear the road in just under forty seconds.

via: Youtube

A swift job with no fuss!

It is fascinating to see how gentle and civilized these creatures are behaving...

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And it is also refreshing to see the locals treat their animals with such great respect.

Wildlife rangers had been tracking the elephants through the wilderness during the day then quickly blocked off the road to prevent any accidents.

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The filmer, Pratya Chutipat Sakul, said, "More than 50 wild elephants crossed the highway. They were moving together from one part of the jungle to the other. The wildlife officers had been following the elephants for the last few days."

Locals were happy to add some time onto their journeys to let the elephants pass...

via: Youtube

"Nobody minds waiting for the elephants, as the most important thing is that they're safe. The elephants were all so calm and barely noticed the humans. I feel very lucky to have seen such an amazing sight."

Watch the incredible footage here...

And make sure to keep scrolling to read about why tourists must never ride elephants when in Thailand...