Influencers Can No Longer Use ‘Misleading’ Filters in Paid Beauty Ads

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Instagram influencers have evolved over the past decade into something we couldn’t have seen coming. These pseudo-celebrity personalities are popping up all across social media offering their tips on haircare, daily diets, and letting us see a small glimpse of what it’s like to live a day in their shoes.

But one piece of legislation may be set to change the influencer game in a big way…

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People seem to be hooked on their phones more than ever – taking pictures of anything and everything and eagerly posting them to the app.

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An increasing number of people are earning a living through posting on the app – many of whom are earning the big bucks.

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From what they eat to where they buy their clothes, their followers know the ins and outs of their daily life – or at least the filtered, online version anyway.

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They regularly document their travels on their pages – which is basically Instagram-central when it comes to getting snaps for their content-hungry followers.

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From Iceland to Tokyo, to Bali. They share the ideal life across multiple pictures a day.

  via Getty  

With tropical scenery and breathtaking temples, it’s no wonder so many Instagram-addicts flock to places like these in order to up their Instagram game.

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It looks like all fun and games, but is it really?

From luxury villas and dreamy outdoor showers to relaxing pools and mouthwatering food, influencers vacationing on these islands love to share it all with us. And, of course, the snaps always look stunning – there’s no doubt that they make us want to hop on the next plane to paradise.

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But influencers haven’t been without their bad press – with some having somehow managed to offend areas like these on more than one occasion…

For example, remember when the Stockholm-based influencer, Natalie Schlater, was forced to delete her Instagram after posting a controversial photo wherein she compared her life to that of a rice farmer in Bali?  

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Yeah, it was pretty bad…

The post in question featured Schlater staring into the distance, while, in the background, a Balinese rice farmer could be seen.
But it was the caption that sparked outrage, where she wrote: “Thinking about how different my life is from the man picking in the rice field every morning.”

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And rightly so. It was a pretty awful, poorly judged thing to write, regardless of whether it was taken the wrong way or not.
Not to mention the fact that rice farming has been a part of Balinese culture for over two-thousand years and is deemed to be both extremely spiritual and communal.

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  via : Shutterstock  

The tourist hot-spots are seeing a rise in disrespectful behavior. So much so that, according to The Guardian, authorities in Bali are planning to introduce new rules and regulations for tourists visiting the sacred sites  – including people posing in bikinis and climbing over Hindu structures. Last year, Bali’s deputy governor, Tjokorda Oka Artha Sukawati, known as Cok Ace, said that the authorities are looking to re-evaluate the system that currently allows tourists to visit the island’s temples unaccompanied.

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With officials clamping down on the issue, it’s a question that many people are starting to ask.
But the problem doesn’t look like it’s going away any time soon…

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There’s also another issue with the influencer community…

… the use of filters.

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Some of which are incredibly fake.

Many celebrities and influencers come under fire for heavily editing their images.

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With the rise of the influencer, people are constantly bombarded with a stream of jealousy-inducing getaways, celebrities, and “perfect” bodies.

It’s becoming a huge issue, especially among the younger generations.

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It’s easy to forget that people’s Instagram feeds are simply highlight reels of their lives…



And people only post pictures of themselves they are totally happy with – chances are they don’t look like that all the time.

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Several people have spoken out about just how toxic Instagram/influencer culture really is…

And the impact it can have on people’s mental health and self-esteem is detrimental.

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Well, thanks to a campaign by Sasha Louise Pallari, a British Instagrammer …

This all seems set to change …

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The Advertising Standards Agency has ruled influencers cannot use face filters when promoting beauty products.

“#FILTERDROP was created as an extension of everything I believe in for beauty. I’ve worked in this industry for almost ten years and with this campaign, I’ve changed how it will be seen online,” Pallari explained.

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“I feel like the detrimental effect this is having on social media users has finally been taken seriously and this is a huge step in the right direction for how filters are used and the way cosmetics are advertised online.”

“I can now help make a difference to how these women view themselves in the mirror and that’s amazing.”

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Any images breaking these new rules can be taken down and banned from re-upload.

We hope this is a step towards more people feeling confident in their own skin.
Keep scrolling for more trending news…

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