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Climate change activist Greta Thunberg seems to have caused quite a stir with her comments over New Zealand's Climate Change Policy...

So much so, Jacinda Ardern has decided to clap back...

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Sharing her own thoughts on what Thunberg describes as their "so-called climate emergency declaration."

Now, Thunberg is usually known for something other than her brutal treatment of world leaders...

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Thanks to her relentlessly passionate activism, the Swedish environmentalist has skyrocketed to international fame.

But where did it all begin?

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Starting one day in August 2018, a then fifteen-year-old Thunberg decided to skip school to sit outside Sweden's Parliament in Stockholm with the simple sign, “Skolstrejk För Klimatet" - translating to “School Strike for Climate."

For 3 weeks, the teenager would sit in silent protest outside of Parliament alone...

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And vowed to not stop until her government had done something about the climate change crisis. And it didn't take long for her message to catch on.

Photos of the teen sitting in protest went viral on social media...

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And, suddenly, millions of people were inspired.

Within a year, her message had spread like wildfire...

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And millions of people all over the world had taken to the streets to fight against climate change.

It was a whirlwind year for the teenager.

Thunberg attended numerous marches and protests all over the world and was even invited to the UN Climate Conference in New York, which she traveled to on a zero-emissions boat.

Her damning speech went viral...

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The activist blasted world leaders and politicians for their lack of action regarding climate change. "How dare you," she exclaimed. "I shouldn't be up here. I should be back in school on the other side of the ocean, yet you all come to us young people for hope. How dare you?"

So, fast forward to 2020...

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Greta Thunberg has become something of a household name.

She was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize last year...

And was declared as TIME's Person of the Year for 2019.

She has risen to unprecedented levels of fame...

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And her unwavering commitment to saving our planet continues to inspire people to live more sustainably every day.

And today, she is in the headlines once again.

But this time, for getting involved in New Zealand's latest climate change policy...

After hearing what she had to say...

People had some strong reactions.

Ardern isn't too pleased that the activist referred to the plan as "nothing unique."

Thunberg posted on Twitter in response to the country's latest pledge.

Clearly, she wasn't impressed by their pledge to reduce carbon emissions by 2025...

"In other words, the government has just committed to reducing less than 1 percent of the country's emissions by 2025." She wrote underneath it: "Text explaining New Zealand's so-called climate emergency declaration. "This is of course nothing unique to any nation."

Ardern has since defended the policy, stating it isn't a "sum ambition" for New Zealand.

Ardern hadn't seen the tweet, but was told it gave "reference to our public service carbon neutral goal of 2025."

She added...

"I would, of course, give the context there that, if that was the sum ambition of any government, then that would be worthy of criticism."

"It is not our sum ambition. And it is not the totality of our plans on climate change."

"But again, I think that it's actually for us just to get on with the business of fulfilling our obligations and expectations."

She went on to say it's a "good thing that there are people out there continuing to urge ambition and action."

Climate Change Minister James Shaw has also defended the policy: "Greta Thunberg is essentially pointing out what we already know, that we have a long way to go to narrow the gap between what our emissions are right now, and what they need to be in the future."

He continued...

"We are working on this as quickly as we can and the declaration of a climate emergency is actually helping - because now every part of government is clear that action to cut emissions is a priority. "This is what climate emergency declaration should do. It is not an end in itself, rather it signals our intent to do everything we can to tackle the climate crisis and build a better, safer future for our kids and grandkids."

Ardern announced a climate emergency earlier this month...

Revealing she wanted to create a carbon-neutral government by 2025. Let's hope that's possible! Keep scrolling for more environmental emergencies...