A new poll has found that more Americans than ever before are identifying as LGBTQ+.

The number is simply staggering...

Now, this kind of news has been a long time coming.

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For centuries, the LGBTQ+ community has been wrongfully discriminated against, meaning that people who identify in such a way haven't felt the confidence to come out and embrace their true selves.

But, as the years have trickled by...

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The fight for acceptance and equality has grown.

Since the birth of Gay Pride in 1969, millions have marched for gay rights...

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And the movement is showing no signs of slowing down today.

We've come a long way.

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Here in the States, the LGBTQ+ community is bigger and prouder than ever before.

In Congress, we now have a number of openly-gay and trans congressmen and women...

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And, in 2015, the Supreme Court ruled same-sex marriage as a legal right across the country.

Obviously, this was a landmark moment in the community's fight for equality.

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Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote that the plaintiffs asked "for equal dignity in the eyes of the law. The Constitution grants them that right."

Fast forward 6 years, and the community is thriving...

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So much so that it is bigger than ever before.

And, according to a recent poll...

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A record number of Americans identify as LGBTQ+.

As stated earlier, a new Gallup report has produced some interesting findings on how the youth of America identify...

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And people have been rejoicing at the results.

The results were based on more than 15,000 interviews conducted with adults eighteen and older throughout 2020.

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According to the survey, an estimated 5.6 percent of Americans identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or queer.

This is a huge jump from last year...

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Where just 4.5 percent had reported to identify in such a way.

Just to break down the results:

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54.6 percent identified as bisexual, 24.5 percent as gay, 11.7 percent as lesbians, 11.3 percent as transgender, and 3.3 percent said they used another term to describe their identity.

The total exceeds 100 percent because respondents were able to choose more than one category.