Nevada has voted in favor of a groundbreaking move for the LGBTQ+ community.

Amid the chaos, election week has seen a huge victory for the LGBTQ+ community.

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And it comes courtesy of the state of Nevada.

The move is huge news for the state.

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And residents have been expressing their pride on social media.

The LGBTQ+ community is stronger than ever.

Since the annual observance of LGBT History Month began in the U.S. in 1994, the growth and acceptance of this community has been absolutely staggering.

LGBTQ+ identifying people are prouder than ever before...

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And, because of the growing numbers of barriers being broken down, more and more people are coming out openly and proudly as LGBTQ+.

But discrimination still lurks.

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Despite amazing development, an array of narrow-minded individuals who spread constant hatred and fear amongst this community are still in existence.

Discrimination comes in many different forms.

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Whether it's in the form of cyber-bullying or in the form of a violent physical act, discrimination against the LGBTQ+ community is rife. No type of discrimination is okay.

These hate crimes are happening all over the world and it's not okay.

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It’s a heartbreaking reality that hate crimes against the community still happen.

Education is key.

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It is common knowledge that those who discriminate against and abuse members of the LGBTQ+ community are often uneducated on the topic, and are lashing out against something unfamiliar to them.

The support of influential figures and brands can be beneficial, too.

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It has never before been so crucial for those with large platforms to show their support and solidarity with the LGBTQ+ community.

Not to mention all the work Stonewall do...

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They have assisted in achieving the equalization of the age of consent, lifting the ban on LGBT people serving in the military, securing legislation that allowed same-sex couples to adopt, and have even helped to secure same-sex marriages.

Of course, in a groundbreaking move, same-sex marriage was legalized in the US in 2015...

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The Supreme Court ruled in the Obergefell v. Hodges case, striking down bans in all fifty states.

The ruling inactivated bans in state constitutions...

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However, the Supreme Court could move to reverse the decision.

Concerns about same-sex marriage bans surged recently with the appointment of Justice Amy Coney Barrett to the Supreme Court.

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According to The Washington Post, Barrett has previously refused to say the Obergefell case was correctly decided.

Speaking after Barrett’s confirmation hearing, Human Rights Campaign President Alphonso David said:

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"She defended the dissenters in the court’s landmark marriage-equality case. She refused to say whether the landmark case Lawrence v. Texas [decriminalizing homosexual intimacy] was correctly decided."

He continued.

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"She sidestepped questions about preserving LGBTQ nondiscrimination protections. And she refused to denounce prior writings and statements that, if implemented through the court, could result in a systematic regression of LGBTQ rights."

On election day, citizens were given the option to completely remove the same-sex ban from the state constitution.

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Voting on a statement that read:  "Marriage would be defined as between couples, regardless of gender, though religious organizations and clergypersons would have the right to refuse to solemnize a marriage."

The ban in question originated from a 2002 amendment that defined marriage as a union between one man and one woman.

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Nevada was one of thirty states which held provisions in their constitution that defined marriage as between one man and one woman.

But not for much longer...

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Figures show more than sixty-one percent of Nevada residents voted in favor of removing the ban from the constitution, while more than thirty-eight percent voted against it.

The LGBTQ+ community and allies celebrated the decision on social media.

While Nevada residents expressed their pride for their state for becoming the first to remove the ban.

It marks a huge step in the right direction.

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Let's hope that more states follow suit. Meanwhile, eyes are on Nevada for its results in the ongoing presidential election. Scroll on for the latest...