Suspected Poacher Trampled to Death by Elephant in South Africa

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A suspected rhino poacher has died after being trampled by an elephant in South Africa.

Here’s the full story…

Now, the issue of poaching has plagued the animal kingdom for centuries.

Over time, activities such as poaching and trophy hunting have claimed the lives of millions of wild animals, and it’s all in the name of human entertainment. 

The animals are often bred in captivity and are released into a fenced-off area where they are cornered and gunned down by hunters.

These animals are actually bred to be hunted…

And, across Africa, there are hundreds of breeding facilities that churn out thousands of innocent animals to be hunted.

The animals involved are habituated from an early age, often through being hand-reared and bottle-fed, so that they are no longer naturally fearful of people, making them easy targets for a rifle or bow when it comes to the hunt.

And people travel to shoot and kill these magnificent animals in their natural habitat…

Because here in the U.S. deer hunting is the most extreme that regulated and legal animal hunting will get. For the big “macho” hunters out there, deers are seen as child’s play; many hunters want to take on larger, more dangerous animals to feed their nasty habit.

Keen hunters have been known to fork out tens of thousands of dollars…

Just to corner an innocent and frightened animal and shoot it dead. What kind of satisfaction they get from it, we will never know.

Trophy hunting is sadly a booming business.

The industry employs ranchers, outfitters, professional hunters, gun manufacturers, and taxidermists alike. People with time, money, and a lack of sanity to ensure the business keeps on giving.

And those participating even claim they’re doing so for the greater good…

By insisting that they’re helping to fund “conservation efforts” with the money that they pay to hunt.

Some hunters even claim to help endangered species with their hunting…

Back in January 2014, Corey Knowlton from Dallas, bid $350,000 for a permit to hunt and kill a then-endangered black rhino in Namibia.

“I felt like from day one it was something benefiting the black rhino,” Knowlton told CNN. “Being on this hunt, with the amount of criticism it brought and the amount of praise it brought from both sides, I don’t think it could have brought more awareness to the black rhino.”

Sadly, the West African Black Rhino is now fully extinct…

With poaching and hunting being the primary factors to the species’ decline.

But this week, karma struck back.

It has been reported that a suspected rhino poacher has been trampled to death by an elephant, while out hunting in South Africa.

Of course, people have had a lot to say over the news…


The “mangled” body of a man, who is a suspected poacher, was discovered on Thursday in Kruger National Park…

As per CBS News, his body was found as rangers scouted the land in a routine operation to help prevent poaching, Isaac Phaahla, a spokesperson for the national park, told AFP.

Thankfully, no animals were hurt, as the elephant seemed to have got to the poacher before the man and his suspected group could catch or kill anything.

According to CBS News, Phaahla said that anyone who was poaching alongside the man must have fled the scene after he was trampled.

“Initial investigations suspect that the deceased was killed by an elephant and left behind by his accomplices,” he added.

But the good news is the poacher’s phone was left untouched by the elephant…

Meaning a thorough search into any other poachers involved in the incident can be carried out by police. The cell has been handed in to officials so they can start their investigation.

This isn’t the first time poachers have tresspassed on Kruger National Park…

In fact, their rhino population has decreased by a whopping seventy percent over the last decade, leaving just 4,000 roaming wild.

On Tuesday, just days before the poacher was found trampled, the park announced they had arrested 4 other poachers…

“There has been an increase of 29.41% in the number of poachers arrested (twenty-two) as compared to (seventeen) for the same period in 2020,” the park said.

Let’s hope this comes as a deterrent to any other poachers out there.