You're lying awake, for the millionth time this month, desperately trying to fall asleep. Unfortunately, your brain is racing, your to-do list is dancing around in your head, and you can't stop replaying the moment you mispronounced your bosses' name in front of the entire office. You can't fight off these thoughts and it keeps you from falling asleep almost every night.

You glance over and see that your dog is sleeping like a peaceful angel and you wish you could sleep just like she does. But little do you know, that your dog may be struggling to sleep just like you.

A new study is here to tell you that your dog may be more similar to you thank you think; sometimes dogs have trouble sleeping because their problems keep them up at night. Maybe we shouldn't be as jealous of our dogs lives simply because their struggles are real, too.

Why can't we sleep?

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60 million people struggle with insomnia, a sleep disorder that can prevent you from sleeping.

Why do so many people struggle with this?

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There are a lot of different factors that can trigger insomnia to occur in humans.

Do any of these sound familiar?

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Some common reasons people can't fall asleep at night are stress, exercising too late at night, inconsistent sleep schedule or too much caffeine (guilty).

Maybe you're texting in bed?

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Are you up late at night, scrolling on Twitter? This could be a big reason you are having trouble sleeping.

We need sleep.

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Clearly, humans need sleep in order for us to live a healthy life, but it is obvious that a lot of people struggle with the act of falling asleep and then staying asleep.

But what about our pups?

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Since our furry friends don't have Twitter accounts, don't drink coffee or go to the gym, what's their excuse for sleep struggles?

Good boys sleep a lot.

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The average dog can sleep anywhere from 12-14 hours a day, while puppies need somewhere between 18-20 hours a day. What a life!

The can have uneventful days.

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According to the American Kennel Club, dogs spend usually 50% of their day sleeping and 30% of their day lying down.

It can vary depending on the dog.

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These numbers can vary depending on age, size, breed, and health. But overall, dogs sleep a lot, no matter what.

The bigger the dog, the more hours of sleep they need.

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Usually, bigger breeds of dogs need more sleep because they use more energy to play, and run around outside.

We're different, but the same.

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Clearly, this is different than the sleep expectations and habits for humans. But what we do have in common is how the events of our day can affect our sleep for that night.

A bad day usually means a bad sleep.

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Dogs tend to fall asleep quickly after they've had a bad day or after negative experiences, which is similar to humans. But it usually leads to an over inconsistent night of sleep.

You've got to sleep it off.

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You know when you have had the worst day, and you just want to go to bed and pretend it never happened? Well, dogs can feel the same way. Those negative experiences can keep us all up at night.

Big life changes can disrupt sleep.

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Big changes in lifestyle for dogs, such as moving houses or the death of another pet in the house, can lead to disruption in their sleeping habits. Dogs will usually need more sleep after these changes to help get their mood and energy back to normal.

Dogs and sleep have been researched before.

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A study done by the scientific journal, The Royal Society, used negative social interactions and positive social interactions with dogs and then monitored their sleep after.

The positive interactions that were tested:

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These positive social interactions included things like petting and playing fetch.

The negative interactions that were tested:

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Threatening approaches, separation and a still face test, where a human basically stares blankly at the dog, were used for the negative social interactions.

The results

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As you can guess, the dogs did not like their negative social interactions. They did fall asleep faster, but they tossed and turned in their sleep, possibly replaying those negative experiences in their cute, little furry heads.

Sending out positive vibes.

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The positive social interactions led to consistent good nights sleep for the dog. Nothing like getting your belly rubbed to guarantee a peaceful night.

This poor, good boy.

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Clearly, this pup had a pretty crazy dream that disrupted his peaceful sleep. I could watch this gif all day, but I still feel bad for laughing when he runs into the wall. I wonder what mailman he was chasing?

The REM cycle for dogs.

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When dogs first fall asleep, it takes about 10-20 minutes until they enter REM (rapid eye movement).

More sleep, less REM.

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Humans usually spend about 25% of their sleep in REM. Since dogs have such inconsistent sleep schedules, they only spend about 10% total in REM.

It's a dogs' world.

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Dogs are flexible sleepers and have the unique gift to fall asleep out of pure boredom, then wake up completely alert almost immediately.

Dogs also dream in their sleep.

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Studies at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found that it is very likely that dogs dream while they sleep. What are they dreaming about, you may ask? Common dog activities like running, eating or chasing a ball.

Sometimes, they have nightmares.

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Joseph Baker, a scientist, noticed his own dog's sleeping patterns and recalled a quite hilarious story about his own dog. "This brings me to my dog. Goober is a basenji, and like many basenjis, he hates water and being bathed. As soon as my wife finishes bathing him he bolts out of the bathroom door, finds me, and tries to hide behind me or under me. So one day Goober was forced to be cleaned and underwent his ritual of hiding behind me. Later that night he was sleep running. He awoke with a start, and then bolted to my location to hide under my legs. This was very awkward as I was sitting on the toilet at the time. I believe that he was dreaming, and I believe that he was dreaming about having a bath. I believe this because he only engages in this behavior when a bath is involved."

In conclusion:

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Clearly what happens during the day can affect a dogs' sleep or their lack of sleep. Good and bad experiences can both disrupt their sleeping schedule, and affect any dreams they may have. The study concluded that "This result provides the first direct evidence that emotional stimuli affect subsequent sleep physiology in dogs."

What a life these dogs have.

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There are many times in my life where I wished I was a dog. Their sleeping schedule is what makes me the most jealous.

Their sleeping habits are very relatable.

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I, too, can fall asleep out of pure boredom. Ask any of my college professors, they will attest to this truth. But it does take about 50 alarms for me to wake up in the morning, so this is where I wish I had the natural gifts of a dog.

Take care of your dog!

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Your sweet dog might stay up all night worried that the mailman is going to break in, or that you might not mean it when you tell him he's a good boy. Positivity for your pup is very important.

Say it again for the dog lovers in the back.

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Go ahead and share this with your fellow dog lovers, and let them know that their furry friend may be up all night worried just like you are.