A wildlife park has been left with no choice but to remove some potty-mouthed parrots from display after they kept swearing at customers. Keep on reading to learn more about these intelligent but vulgar birds...

We all know that the wonderful thing about parrots...

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Is that they can talk!

Okay, so they can't hold an articulate conversation...

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But these fascinating birds have the incredible ability to mimic human words and sentences.

So, how exactly do they talk?

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Parrots are a part of the songbird family, so they use their voices to warn, to court, to communicate with their nestlings, and to fight to defend a territory.

The sounds they make have a huge variation...

And a small number of parrot species are actually able to imitate human noises and words.

Breeds such as African Greys, Timneh Greys, and Yellow Naped Amazons are the best at talking...

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And this is achieved by modifying the air that flows over the syrinx to make sounds - The syrinx is located where the trachea splits into the lungs.

It's truly the most fascinating thing to witness...

And the fact that parrots don't have lips or teeth makes it even more mind-boggling to hear them chattering away!

Take this parrot singing Beyonce's "If I Were A Boy" as an example...

Absolutely note-perfect.

Now, a parrot talking and singing is all imitation...

And this means that if they hear something several times... they will more than likely mimic what they hear, which can result in quite a problem for birds in captivity.

In the U.S alone, there are approximately 10 - 40 million parrots live in captivity...

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Which means these birds come into contact with a lot of people, and therefore, a lot of different words and sentences.

Well, one wildlife park in the U.K recently found that this exposure to a wide dialect became a bit of a problem...

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And they resulted in removing some potty-mouthed parrots from the premises.

5 African Grey parrots were adopted by Lincolnshire Wildlife Park last month...

And after time spent quarantining, they recently prepared to join the park’s other 1,500 parrots.

But while the 5 birds were kept in the same room together...

They came up with a fun new hobby - squawking obscenities at one another that they had learned from previous enclosures.

Yep, the parrots were having a field day using the dirtiest language they could think of.

Chief executive officer of the wildlife park, Steve Nichols, told Lincolnshire Live that since the park’s opening in 2003, it has "always taken in parrots that have sometimes had a bit of blue language", so it’s something staff are used to, though it never fails to be funny.

He continued:

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"But, just by coincidence, we took in 5 in the same week and because they were all quarantined together it meant that one room was just full of swearing birds. The more they swear the more you usually laugh which then triggers them to swear again."

After hearing the staff laugh at their language, the birds began to laugh too...

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Which lead to the cage being filled with nothing but laughter and swear words. Amazing.

Having spent days perfecting their routine, the birds were more than ready to show it off to the park’s customers...

Which is exactly what they did as soon as they were out of quarantine.

Nichols said the birds swore at a customer within twenty minutes of being let loose...

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And before long, "all sorts of obscenities came out" with one woman "really [getting] some abuse."

Thankfully, the customers found it all very funny...

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But the staff were worried at the thought of children coming to the park at the weekend, so in an attempt to make them stop swearing, they put the birds in an off-shore enclosure in the hope that "they will start learning other parrots’ noises."

This particular breed is "very good at learning vocalizations from all sorts of noises."

In case the birds continue their bad habits, Lincolnshire Wildlife Park now plans to release them in separate areas so any swearing will at least be more subtle, rather than "3 or 4 of them all blasting it out at once."

Even though the decision to remove the parrots was a sensible one...

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People believe it's "sad" to remove the birds due to their intelligence and the inevitability of them picking up some bad language.

The parrots aren't the ones to blame here...

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They're just doing what they do best - mimicking!

We hope that these parrots learn a new vocabulary very soon so they can be released back into their enclosures!

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For more, keep on scrolling to learn about the parrot who was able to fly again after been given a new pair of wings...