A woman has won $248,000 after her boss wouldn't let her leave early to pick up her baby daughter from kindergarten.

Alice Thompson, from the United Kingdom, was earning $165,000 a year...

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She was a full-time sales manager at Manors, a small real estate firm in London when she became pregnant in 2018. Upon her giving birth, she asked her boss if she could go part-time, working 4 days a week, and finishing at 5 PM instead of 6 PM.

But company director Paul Sellar rejected her request...

He explained that the business couldn't afford to do that and feared it would cause a "detrimental effect on the ability to meet customer demand" and "inability to reorganize work among existing staff."

So, Thompson resigned, taking the company to an employment tribunal, claiming she was driven to do so in order to ensure her daughter does not have "the same experience" when she grows up.

Prior to this, the sales manager was a huge success at work, and she was "well thought of" too, but as she told Mr. Sellar she was pregnant in 2018, tensions began to rise...

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The mom even heard him say to another colleague while celebrating the news at a party: "I thought, for f**** sake, why is she pregnant when we are doing so well? I was warned about employing a married woman of her age."

And the staff were even taken to a trip to New York, with a "booze-fuelled boat trip", which she had to sit out.

Are we not in the 21st century that women can't have children and work?

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But, Mr. Sellar fought back, saying she was ungrateful to feel isolated when the trip cost him $25,000, the tribunal heard.

And when it came time to take her maternity leave, Thompson was told to hand in her office keys and work phone. Later that month, was even told she's emotional due to the pregnancy, after trying to voice her concerns.

However, in the end, the panel then awarded the mom $342,499.35 for loss of earnings, pension contributions, injury to feeling, and interest, finding that the company's insistence on a 6 PM finish placed her at a disadvantage.

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Even though she won, she still remains disappointed with how things worked out at her company saying: "I thought I would have been worth more to the company; I thought I would have been shown some respect and recognition for my hard work."