via shutterstock  

‘World’s Most Experienced Pilot’ Explains the Truth Behind Why We Use Brace Position on Planes

VitaCup’s NEW Hydration Coffee is here! Unlock 10% off your purchase.

Here's your promo code:

Copy Code
Enter at checkout on Amazon.com

The world’s most experienced Boeing 747 pilot, who has forty years of experience up in the air, has shared the real reason why we use the brace position.

advertisement

The majority of us will have taken a plane once in our lifetime.

  via Shutterstock  

And if you’ve ever been on a flight, you’ll be aware of the cabin crew’s routine before takeoff.

advertisement

The one where they tell you the exits, how to fasten your seatbelt… the whole spiel.

  via Shutterstock  

Well, you might also remember that there’s a guide for passengers tucked into the seat in front, telling you exactly what to do in the event of an emergency.

advertisement

In addition to showing you how to put on your oxygen masks, there’s also another important part.

  via shutterstock  

And that’s a diagram showing you how to do the brace position in the unlikely case of a crash.

advertisement

But why was the brace position created, and who came up with it?

  via shutterstock  

Well, the “world’s most experienced pilot” has shared the secrets behind it all.

advertisement

The position is supposedly meant to prepare your body for impact, helping to shield the most important areas.

  via shutterstock  

And is achieved by bending over and putting your hands over your head.

advertisement

However, there have been some rumors suggesting it’s designed to kill immediately on impact.

  via Shutterstock  

Despite this theory, the pilot in question has denied that, sharing that the first is the true reason why.

advertisement

Nick Eades, the world’s most experienced Boeing 747 pilot recently revealed to LADbible: “What you’re trying to do is to stop people breaking their necks in a big impact.”

  via shutterstock  

He continued: “You’re just trying to get the body into a position that’s going to suffer the least damage. It’s like whiplash – you’re trying to avoid that sudden movement of the head, which can result in serious injury, if not death.”

advertisement

And in his forty-year career as a pilot, he’s had to tell passengers to brace more than a couple of times.

  via shutterstock  

Eades said: “I’ve had a couple where we had problems with the landing gear, and the cabin crew shouts to all the passengers, ‘Brace, brace!'”

advertisement

“Now, if you think about it, I would say at least half – probably three-quarters – of passengers on the airplane don’t speak English as a first language. And if you think about it, what does ‘brace’ mean?”

  via shutterstock  

He explained: “It took a long time for the aviation world to realize if you’re suddenly thrown into an emergency situation and people start shouting ‘brace’ at you, you might think, ‘What the hell do they mean?'”

advertisement

After reviewing the old way of doing things, Eades shared crew are now being told to give new instructions in the event of an emergency. “The brace position is going to become redundant, so cabin crew won’t shout ‘brace’ at you anymore.”

  via shutterstock  

“They’ll say, ‘Head down, hands over your head. Head down, hands over your head.’ At least that gives somebody in probably the most stressful position they’ll ever be in in their lives something to do.”

advertisement

Eades also shared some other fascinating information…

  via shutterstock  

He gave some inside info on why they dim the lights and why passengers are told to open the blinds before landing.

advertisement

The pilot said: “In Rhodesia in the 70s, they had a war and there was a viscount – which is a four-engine propeller airplane – coming into land.”

  via shutterstock  

“But all the blinds were up and that gave the terrorists – the guerillas in the jungle – something to shoot at. What these guys were doing was they were waiting for the airplane to come in and the lights were all on. They could actually see something and they shot two of the viscounts down, with a loss of life.”

advertisement

The other reason is it also helps passengers in an emergency, or if there’s a failed landing.

  via shutterstock  

Eades continued: “Let’s say you’re landing at night. If the blinds were all down and the lights were up, if suddenly everything became dark, it takes the human eye quite a long time to react to the change in light.

advertisement

He continued: “So what we do now is we dim the airplane for landing at night, and we lift the blinds up so people can see out, and also so their eyes are adjusted to the light.”

  via shutterstock  

He added: “A part of the eye opens and closes, and it takes a while to do that and to adjust to the light, so it’s just adjusting people to the environment, just in case there is a problem. You’ll have a far greater chance of being able to see what’s going on and getting out.”

advertisement

That’s definitely good to know!

  via shutterstock  

What do you think about Eades comments?

advertisement