A white woman decided to make casual conversation with the repairman that came over, but she ended up having a conversation she'll never forget.

Keep scrolling to see the full Facebook post in which she revealed "the truth."

Why is it important to understand the BLM movement?

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Simply put, the movement was created in 2013 after George Zimmerman was acquitted of murdering Trayvon Martin, a seventeen-year-old schoolboy who was walking home with a bag of Skittles after visiting his father's fiancée.

An altercation ensued even though Zimmerman was told not to get involved by a superior.

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And when the police arrived on the scene, Martin was dead with bullet wounds and Zimmerman claimed he acted in self-defense. After a lengthy trial that gripped the nation, the off-duty "captain of the neighborhood patrol" was released without any charges.

That's when the Black Lives Matter hashtag started trending.

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This was because Trayvon Martin's life was brutally ended over a stereotype that black boys in hoodies are deemed as a "threat." Zimmerman's only claim to stopping the young man was because he "looked suspicious."

But why? What made him suspicious?

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If it was the hoodie, why don't other people in hoodies get stopped as often as black boys and men? At the time, you would think it was just one isolated incident, but over the next seven years, up until this day, the same situation continued to take place but just with a different black person each time.

Say their names.

Trayvon Martin, Eric Garner, Michael Brown, Sandra Bland, Ahmaud Arbery, Breana Taylor, Elijah McClain, Stephon Clark and more recently, George Floyd and Rayshard Brooks. Look them up if you've never heard of them.

According to The Washington Post, black people are being killed twice as much as white people.

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And this is even despite the fact that they only make up thirteen percent of the population. Are you understanding that fact alone is a problem? Or is it still just a coincidence to you that all these young black folk are now dead?

Just because you're not racist, doesn't mean others aren't.

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And with the oppression of black people being systemic, which means it's rooted within the foundations of our society, racism has become a second pandemic.

It's time to get educated.

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The only way to be able to help each other is to understand what's going on and one woman unintentionally did that by asking the black repairman that came over about the problem of racism.

In an emotional Facebook post, Caroline Crockett Brock revealed the "truth" behind the issue.

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And her message really made people think about where they are going wrong with this entire thing.

She started off like this:

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"I am a 45-year-old white woman living in the south, and today was the first time I spoke frankly about racism with a black man." Already, we can see there is an apparent but maybe unintentional divide between some people who may not have felt the need to get first-hand evidence of the problems black people face in the country.

She continued:

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"When Ernest Skelton, my appliance repairman, came to the front door, I welcomed him in. As this was his second visit and we’d established a friendly rapport, I asked him how he was feeling in the current national climate. Naturally, he assumed I was talking about the coronavirus, because what white person actually addresses racism head-on, in person, in their own home?"

"When Ernest realized I wanted to know about his experience with racism, he began answering my questions."

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"What’s it like for you on a day-to-day basis as a black man? Do cops ever give you any trouble? "The answers were illuminating." This next part is very important.

Ernest talked about the problems he faced as a black man working in America.

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"Ernest, a middle-aged, friendly, successful business owner, gets pulled over in Myrtle Beach at least 6 times a year. He doesn’t get pulled over for traffic violations, but on the suspicion of him being a suspect in one crime or another. Mind you, he is in uniform, driving in a work van clearly marked with his business on the side. They ask him about the boxes in his car--parts and pieces of appliances. They ask to see his invoices and ask him why there is money and checks in his invoice clipboard. They ask if he’s selling drugs. These cops get angry if he asks for a badge number or pushes back in any way. Every time he is the one who has to explain himself, although they have no real cause to question him."

Ernest continued to explain his experiences...And it is utterly heartbreaking.

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"Ernest used to help folks out after dark with emergencies. Not anymore. He does not work past dinnertime, not because he doesn’t need the business, but because it isn’t safe for him to be out after dark. He says “There’s nothing out there in the world for me past dark."

She was shocked upon hearing this. How was he not allowed to work past a certain time?

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"Let me say that again. Ernest, a middle-aged black man in uniform cannot work past dark in Myrtle Beach in 2020 because it’s not safe for him. He did not say this with any kind of agenda. It was a quiet, matter of fact truth. A truth that needs to be heard."

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"Ernest says most white people are a little scared of him, and he’s often put in a position where he has to prove himself, as though he’s not qualified to repair appliances..."

She continued re-telling us how Ernest's experiences had changed her:

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"Ernest doesn’t have hope that racism will change, no matter who the president is. His dad taught him “It’s a white man’s world", and he’s done his best to live within it. When I asked him what I could do, he said, 'everyone needs to pray and realize we’re all just one country and one people'."

And she finished the emotional post off with some advice:

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"I am a 45-year-old white woman living in the south. I can begin healing our country by talking frankly with African Americans in my world - by LISTENING to their lived experience and speaking up. I can help by actively promoting black-owned businesses. That’s what I can do today. Let’s start by listening and lifting up. It’s that simple."

So the message is to listen and empathize, for those of you that still don't get it.

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Just this one chat has changed everything. A quick update between Caroline and Ernest revealed that they went out to dinner together and even attended a peaceful BLM protest together down in their hometown of Myrtle Beach.

These are the stories we love to hear about.

If you want to learn more about why this issue is important to support, then keep scrolling...